Poll

Once good channels...

MTV
5 (23.8%)
VH1
3 (14.3%)
Nickelodeon/Nick at Nite
1 (4.8%)
Cartoon Network/Adult Swim
1 (4.8%)
Disney Channel
3 (14.3%)
MTV2
2 (9.5%)
ESPN
1 (4.8%)
AMC
0 (0%)
TV Land
0 (0%)
TBS
0 (0%)
TNT
0 (0%)
ABC
1 (4.8%)
NBC
2 (9.5%)
CBS
1 (4.8%)
Fox
0 (0%)
Comedy Central
0 (0%)
E!
0 (0%)
other: (write in)
1 (4.8%)

Total Members Voted: 4

Author Topic: TV Networks That Went Downhill  (Read 155824 times)

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Offline Out of the Blue

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Re: TV Networks That Went Downhill
« Reply #465 on: January 18, 2016, 12:14:07 AM »
There is a saying that the first generation establishes it, the second generation expands on it, and the third generation loses it completely.  MTV fits that perfectly.  This current generation of executives took the channel in a completely different direction because they either wanted to leave their mark on things or they felt that the original ideas were "outdated and needed to be updated for a modern audience."  That's almost always the shark jumping moment.

Offline Woops

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Re: TV Networks That Went Downhill
« Reply #466 on: January 21, 2016, 01:46:19 PM »
VH1 Classic cancelled "That Metal Show" after 8 years, which was the only original program the channel had.

Much like every other Viacom channel, not really surprised.










Offline Woops

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Re: TV Networks That Went Downhill
« Reply #467 on: March 04, 2016, 10:56:43 AM »
I like that Boomerang is airing Shaun the Sheep, the ironically it's the only UK import since many of the programs, especially airing on international Boomerang networks, are on other channels (ie the preschool stuff  since there's a lot of preschool channels in the US) and streaming providers such as Netflix or Hulu. Like the past several years, it airs current Cartoon Network programs, which some are still in production.

Looney Tunes, Tom & Jerry, and "Scooby Doo, Where Are You" are the only pre-2000 programs on regular hours where "The Flintstones" and "Smurfs" have just been pushed into the dusk.

The only movies they air are direct-to-dvd Scooby Doo and Tom & Jerry, though in the past they would air along side Hanna Barbera tv films/specials such as "Jetsons meet the Flintstones". Thankfully I don't think they ever aired the infamous Tom & Jerry movie from 1992.

Their original shows "Be Cool, Scooby Doo", "Wabbit", and "Bunnicula" also air on Cartoon Network on Saturday Mornings, which is odd since the promo doesn't even promote Boomerang.

The promos/bumpers are also bland and very much the same as regular Cartoon Network.

Since Cartoon Network doesn't treat their action fare fairly, Boomerang would be a great place to showcase them similar to Disney XD, which ironically airs cartoons based on Marvel where as Time Warner owns Cartoon Network and DC Comics.

Something like the defunct Hub Network would work, though rather than aiming as a "family channel", the focus could be on action, adventure, and variety.

Also surprised that Hanna Barbera, along with Looney Tunes and Tom & Jerry aren't even on streaming sites such as Hulu, Netflix, or even digital subchannels such as Antenna or Me-TV. This TV removed animation and while Me-TV currently airs Sid & Marty Krofft shows, they previously aired Classic Media owned programs such as "Masters of the Universe" prior to the catalog being sold to Dreamworks.

Offline Woops

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Re: TV Networks That Went Downhill
« Reply #468 on: June 30, 2016, 03:07:37 AM »
Boomerang just replaced "The Flintstones" and  "Smurfs" for late '90's/2000s Cartoon Network fare such as "Dexter's Lab" and "Grimm Adventures of Billy & Mandy" and "The Flintstones" with "The Jetsons", a bit surprisingly, only shown in the early morning hours in weekends. The network also dumped "Shaun the Sheep", which like Cartoon Network isn't keen on imports or third party acquisitions.  Classic Scooby Doo also have been showing only in early hours with "Be Cool, Scooby Doo" having more airings.






Offline Woops

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Re: TV Networks That Went Downhill
« Reply #469 on: August 02, 2016, 05:59:25 AM »
Aside from hipster music critics and magazines, I think MTV played a major part with the rise of grunge/alternative in the 1990's.

Offline Out of the Blue

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Re: TV Networks That Went Downhill
« Reply #470 on: August 02, 2016, 11:27:19 PM »
I think they had pretty much everything to do with it.  Back when I was in high school that music was favored only by a small and fringe group that was far outside the mainstream at that time.  Most people thought it was really bad music.

Offline Woops

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Re: TV Networks That Went Downhill
« Reply #471 on: September 16, 2016, 03:59:55 AM »
TV Guide listings from 1990 on Halloween



Cable tv had more variety rather than the same shows on every channel  8)

Also noticed more cartoons on non children/family channels such as TBS, USA, and WGN where when Cartoon Network first appeared in 1992 and Ted Turner bought the rights to Hanna Barbera and pre-1960s MGM, they would fade by around 1995/1996.

Especially now with Disney, which primarily aims toward the female "tweens" demographic, Nickelodeon and Cartoon Network overplay the same 5 or so shows.


Also Halloween was actually celebrated rather than a brief mention and the usual programming being aired.  8) :D

« Last Edit: September 16, 2016, 04:17:45 AM by Woops »

Offline Out of the Blue

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Re: TV Networks That Went Downhill
« Reply #472 on: September 17, 2016, 11:42:25 PM »
I remember when the entire month of October was dedicated to Halloween shows and movies.  Then what happened is parents groups started howling and putting pressure on the networks and the networks gave in.  Now it's like Halloween doesn't even exist.

Offline Woops

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Re: TV Networks That Went Downhill
« Reply #473 on: January 09, 2017, 10:05:57 AM »
Series finale of "Headbangers Ball" (1995)


It sums up MTV in the mid 1990's since most of the clips and videos featuring alternative artists such as Nirvana, Pearl Jam, and Soundgarden. Not to mention non music programs, which along with the cancellation of "The Ball" music videos were given less time to the point it was only shown in late night and morning hour.
« Last Edit: January 09, 2017, 10:07:45 AM by Woops »

Offline Woops

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Re: TV Networks That Went Downhill
« Reply #474 on: March 08, 2017, 12:38:31 PM »
Boomerang to become a subscription streaming service, which will feature Hanna Barbera, Looney Tunes, and various vintage Time Warner owned cartoons.


Offline Out of the Blue

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Re: TV Networks That Went Downhill
« Reply #475 on: March 10, 2017, 12:41:23 AM »
I don't know how successful that's going to be if they keep the TV channel.  I doubt many people will subscribe even if it's only $5 a month.

It seems like Youtube is trying to do something similar.  They launched Youtube Red which is a pay subscription service and it's like they are trying to become another Netflix.  Google, aka Alphabet, owns the site and it's the #1 site on the entire internet so they make big money on ad revenue.  It would be one of the worst business decisions of all time if Alphabet decided to ditch all of the free content on Youtube and either make it entirely a streaming site or make users pay to access the site in general.

Offline Woops

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Re: TV Networks That Went Downhill
« Reply #476 on: August 06, 2017, 03:05:39 AM »
It appears that MTV is trying to revive "TRL", despite that  the show was cancelled about a decade ago and had low ratings towards the end of it's run due to change of interest (ie social media, downloading/streaming).  Even when  the show was at it's peak in the early 2000's  the network had long drifted from its  roots by airing nothing but reality shows and various programs such as "Jackass" and "Punk'd"  Also like "Arsenio Hall" with early 90's  hip hop, it's a product of it's  time where people associate it with boybands, Britney, and Limp Bizkit. In retrospect, it wasn't an actual  video countdown show since it was more about celebrities appearances since the songs were  hardly played and we're interrupted by fans and "email" requests.

Offline Woops

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Re: TV Networks That Went Downhill
« Reply #477 on: September 17, 2017, 12:35:22 PM »
I think VH1 jumped the shark around in the early 2000's when it was mainly pop culture based programming and less on music.

I recall seeing some video blocks such as "The Big 80's", "Women's First", "8 Track Flashback", "Sex Appeal", and the annual "History of Music Video A to Z" in 1996/1997 which ended around 1998/1999 when music videos were pushed aside for original programming such as "Pop-Up Video", "Storytellers", "Where Are They Now?", and "Behind the Music."


 Unlike MTV, which was 99% non music, it still focused on music on the most part and didn't neglect the past.

I actually liked watching "I Love the 80's", mainly for random vintage interview/film footage, and some of the music countdowns, which mainly featured people talking than videos shown. I recalled that VH1 aired music videos from "Top 80 of the 80's during the dusk hours in 2001 during their "8 Days of 80s" week.  8)

Also watched "The Rock Show" (1999 to ?), which was when the channel started airing more hard rock, metal, and alternative videos, which I recall taping classic Motley Crue, Def Leppard, and Guns N' Roses videos though it only played about a few classic videos the bands (ie "Dr. Feelgood" and "Girls Girls Girls" for Motley Crue, "Hot For Teacher" and "Unchained" for Van Halen, etc)



« Last Edit: September 17, 2017, 12:42:32 PM by Woops »

Offline Woops

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Re: TV Networks That Went Downhill
« Reply #478 on: December 07, 2017, 10:42:31 AM »
Found an article from 1992 on the decline of dance shows, which mentions MTV cancelling "Club MTV" despite the ratings were still strong and the vice president of the network at the time Doug Herzog admitting to the channel favoring alternative.

 Also ironic is that the replacement show "The Grind" mainly focused on hip hop and R&B in contrast to "Club MTV" with a mixture of Top 40, freestyle, hip hop, and dance pop. 

"Club MTV" would definitely jump the shark if MTV had replaced Downtown Julie Brown with a "Real World" housemate, the music drastically changied to hardcore rap. Plus, boring and drab mid '90's fashion. Ironically enough,"The Real World" marked the beginning of the end of the channel.



source LA Times article "Will the Beat Go On? : Dance Shows are Slowly Disappearing" from 1992

Quote
Once the height of hipness among teens and others, TV dance shows may be heading the way of vinyl records and polyester disco suits.

Last year, the much-hyped "Party Machine With Nia Peeples" fizzled because of low ratings. In April, MTV announced it was canceling the five-year-old "Club MTV" and letting go of its host, Downtown Julie Brown. At the end of June the USA Network is pulling the plug on its six-year-old "Dance Party USA."


On the other hand, it was just such a comfortable-old-shoe feeling that made MTV decide to drop its own dance show. "Anything you do on MTV for a long time, it just sort of wears out," says Doug Herzog, MTV's senior vice president of programming. " 'Club MTV' was very successful, and it wasn't becoming a ratings disaster, but we wanted to kill it off before it killed itself."

Contributing to the show's tired feeling, says Herzog, was the possibility that its music is finally wearing thin. "The alternative music genre is strong right now, and dance music seems to be taking a back seat," he says, adding that " 'Club MTV' was like a product of the '80s in terms of its glitziness. There was a fantasy aspect to it. What you can feel out there these days is a desire for things of substance, a more organic feel."

MTV's Herzog said that "Club MTV" sometimes did similar interviews, "but we didn't do a good job of that." He also says MTV is experimenting with a revamped version of its dance show. "I would like to see a dance/performance program that's not strictly what people call a disco show, that would include some different musical genres--funk/rock, reggae, hip hop. But the real test is whether the audience will buy into this."




« Last Edit: December 07, 2017, 10:44:34 AM by Woops »